How Much Is a 1995 $5 Bill Worth? (A Complete Guide)

How Much Is a 1995 $5 Bill Worth?

The 1995 $5 bill is a relatively common bill, but it can still be worth a good amount of money, depending on its condition. In general, uncirculated bills in perfect condition can sell for around $10, while bills that have been circulated but are still in good condition can sell for around $5. However, there are a few factors that can affect the value of a 1995 $5 bill, such as its serial number, the signatures on the bill, and whether or not it is a star note.

In this article, we will take a closer look at the factors that affect the value of a 1995 $5 bill and discuss how to determine how much your bill is worth. We will also provide some tips on how to sell your bill if you are interested in doing so.

So, if you have a 1995 $5 bill and you are curious about how much it is worth, keep reading!

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Year Condition Value
1995 Uncirculated $10-$15
1995 Circulated $5-$10

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A 1995 $5 bill is a United States currency note that was issued from 1995 to 2013. The note is green and features the portrait of President William McKinley on the obverse and the Statue of Liberty on the reverse. The 1995 $5 bill is no longer in circulation, but it is still a valuable collectible.

Factors Affecting the Value of a 1995 $5 Bill

There are a number of factors that can affect the value of a 1995 $5 bill, including:

  • Serial number: The serial number of a bill is a unique identifier that can be used to track its history. Bills with low serial numbers or serial numbers that are in sequence are often more valuable than bills with higher serial numbers or random serial numbers.
  • Condition: The condition of a bill is also important. Bills that are in uncirculated condition are more valuable than bills that have been circulated.
  • Grade: Bills can be graded by professional numismatists. The grade of a bill is based on its condition and other factors. Bills with higher grades are more valuable than bills with lower grades.
  • Demand: The demand for a 1995 $5 bill can also affect its value. Bills that are in high demand are more valuable than bills that are not in demand.

Serial number

The serial number of a 1995 $5 bill is a 10-digit number that is printed on the front of the bill. The first two digits of the serial number represent the Federal Reserve Bank that issued the bill. The next six digits are a random number. The last two digits are a check digit that is used to verify the authenticity of the bill.

Serial numbers can be used to track the history of a bill. For example, you can use a serial number to find out where a bill was issued and when it was put into circulation. You can also use a serial number to see if a bill has been counterfeited.

Condition

The condition of a 1995 $5 bill is important because it affects the value of the bill. Bills that are in uncirculated condition are more valuable than bills that have been circulated.

Uncirculated bills are bills that have never been used. These bills are usually found in bank vaults or in collections. Uncirculated bills are often in perfect condition, with no tears, folds, or other damage.

Circulated bills are bills that have been used. These bills may have tears, folds, or other damage. The more damage a bill has, the less valuable it is.

Grade

Bills can be graded by professional numismatists. The grade of a bill is based on its condition and other factors. Bills with higher grades are more valuable than bills with lower grades.

The following are the different grades that a 1995 $5 bill can receive:

  • Uncirculated (MS-65 or higher): Uncirculated bills are in perfect condition. These bills have no tears, folds, or other damage.
  • About Uncirculated (AU-58 or higher): About uncirculated bills are in excellent condition. These bills have minor flaws, such as a few small tears or folds.
  • Very Fine (VF-20 or higher): Very fine bills are in good condition. These bills have some wear and tear, such as folds, creases, and small tears.
  • Fine (F-12 or higher): Fine bills are in fair condition. These bills have moderate wear and tear, such as folds, creases, and tears.
  • Good (G-4 or higher): Good bills are in poor condition. These bills have significant wear and tear, such as large tears, holes, and other damage.

Demand

The demand for a 1995 $5 bill can also affect its value. Bills that are in high demand are more valuable than bills that are not in demand.

The demand for a 1995 $5 bill can be affected by a number of factors, such as:

  • The popularity of the bill’s design.
  • The rarity of the bill.
  • The condition of the bill.
  • The grade of the bill.

The value of a 1995 $5 bill can vary depending on a number of factors, including the serial number, condition, grade, and demand. If you have a

How Much Is a 1995 $5 Bill Worth?

The value of a 1995 $5 bill depends on its condition and whether it is a Federal Reserve Note or a United States Note.

Federal Reserve Notes

Federal Reserve Notes are the most common type of U.S. currency. They are printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and issued by the Federal Reserve System. Federal Reserve Notes are legal tender in the United States and are accepted at all banks and businesses.

The value of a 1995 Federal Reserve Note in good condition is around $5. In uncirculated condition, a 1995 Federal Reserve Note can be worth up to $10.

United States Notes

United States Notes are a type of paper currency that was issued by the U.S. Treasury from 1861 to 1966. They are no longer legal tender, but they can still be redeemed at the U.S. Treasury for their face value.

The value of a 1995 United States Note depends on its condition and the serial number. In good condition, a 1995 United States Note can be worth around $5. In uncirculated condition, a 1995 United States Note can be worth up to $100.

Rare 1995 $5 Bills

There are a few rare 1995 $5 bills that can be worth more than $100. These include:

  • Bills with a star in the serial number.
  • Bills with a low serial number, such as 00000001 or 99999999.
  • Bills that are misprinted or damaged.

If you have a rare 1995 $5 bill, you can have it appraised by a professional numismatist.

Circulation

The 1995 $5 bill was printed in large quantities and is still in circulation today. However, it is becoming increasingly rare to find a 1995 $5 bill in uncirculated condition.

The 1995 $5 bill was replaced by the new $5 bill design in 2013. The new $5 bill features the image of President Abraham Lincoln on the front and the Lincoln Memorial on the back.

Rarity

The 1995 $5 bill is not considered to be a rare bill. However, it is becoming increasingly rare to find a 1995 $5 bill in uncirculated condition.

The 1995 $5 bill is worth around $5 in good condition. In uncirculated condition, a 1995 $5 bill can be worth up to $10.

If you have a rare 1995 $5 bill, you can have it appraised by a professional numismatist.

The value of a 1995 $5 bill depends on its condition and whether it is a Federal Reserve Note or a United States Note.

Federal Reserve Notes are the most common type of U.S. currency and are worth around $5 in good condition. In uncirculated condition, a 1995 Federal Reserve Note can be worth up to $10.

United States Notes are a type of paper currency that was issued by the U.S. Treasury from 1861 to 1966. They are no longer legal tender, but they can still be redeemed at the U.S. Treasury for their face value.

The value of a 1995 United States Note depends on its condition and the serial number. In good condition, a 1995 United States Note can be worth around $5. In uncirculated condition, a 1995 United States Note can be worth up to $100.

If you have a rare 1995 $5 bill, you can have it appraised by a professional numismatist.

Q: How much is a 1995 $5 bill worth?

A: A 1995 $5 bill is worth $5.00.

Q: Are there any rare or valuable 1995 $5 bills?

A: There are no rare or valuable 1995 $5 bills. All 1995 $5 bills are worth the same amount.

Q: What is the difference between a 1995 $5 bill and a 2023 $5 bill?

A: The only difference between a 1995 $5 bill and a 2023 $5 bill is the year of issue. Both bills are worth the same amount.

Q: Can I use a 1995 $5 bill to buy things?

A: Yes, you can use a 1995 $5 bill to buy things. It is a legal tender and is accepted at all businesses that accept US currency.

Q: What should I do if I find a 1995 $5 bill?

A: If you find a 1995 $5 bill, you can either use it to buy things or you can keep it as a collectible.

the value of a 1995 $5 bill depends on a number of factors, including its condition, the series, and the signatures. A circulated bill in good condition is worth around $2, while a bill in uncirculated condition is worth around $5. Bills with rare signatures or from specific series can be worth even more. If you have a 1995 $5 bill that you think may be valuable, it is best to have it appraised by a professional.

Author Profile

Matthew Garfield
Matthew Garfield
I’m Matthew Garfield, the principal writer and strategist behind this blog.

My path in the financial sector is driven by a passion for sharing knowledge and aiding others in their financial journeys.

My foray into the financial world was rooted in a robust educational background. I pursued my undergraduate degree in Finance at a top-tier university, where I was known for my analytical skills and innovative approaches to financial problems. Following this, I furthered my education with a Master’s degree in Economics, specializing in market analysis and economic theory. This academic journey provided me with a solid foundation in financial principles, market dynamics, and economic policies.

After completing my education, I ventured into the corporate finance sector, where I gained invaluable experience over several years. My roles ranged from a financial analyst, where I delved deep into market trends and investment strategies, to a senior advisor, where I guided clients in making informed financial decisions. This experience in the corporate world honed my skills in understanding complex financial instruments, risk management, and strategic financial planning.

The transition from corporate finance to financial writing and education was a natural progression for me. Having accumulated a wealth of knowledge and experience, I felt a strong calling to share this expertise with a broader audience. This blog became the perfect platform for that. Here, I combine my academic background and professional insights to create content that is not only informative but also practical and relatable.

My goal is to demystify the financial world for our readers. Whether it’s explaining investment strategies, breaking down economic trends, or offering personalized financial advice, I aim to make these topics accessible to everyone. My articles are crafted to empower you with the knowledge to make informed financial decisions, whether you’re a seasoned investor or just starting to explore financial planning.